Genre Archive - Experimental

Boy Harsher, Philipp Strobel
10.12.17
Urban Spree

Boy Harsher is a dark electronic duo that produces gritty dance beats infused with ethereal vocals, creating a sound that is eerie, intense and incredibly danceable. Augustus Muller develops the underbelly of sound with minimal beats and grinding synths, where Jae Matthews whispers, screams and chants on top. Together, the music created is somewhere between industrial, drone and confessional storytelling. Muller and Matthews both have a strong background in film and their cinematic approach translates effectively in both their recordings and live performance. Boy Harsher started in early 2013 under the name Teen Dreamz. The project was based on short stories written and read by Matthews then live scored by Muller. As the project matured the instrumentals became more dance influenced and Matthews’ delivery became more dynamic and spontaneous. In January of 2014 Teen Dreamz took on the moniker Boy Harsher.

Show
We Make Waves Festival
09.11.17 Past Show
Acud Macht Neu

Introducing We Make Waves, a new Berlin-based festival and conference made for women, trans and non-binary people poised to disrupt the music industry. This November, we will bring together a group of renegade performers, artists, and activists from Berlin and beyond in order to share transformational ideas, experiences, and motivation for future projects and collaborations.

For our inaugural year, we are proud to present a keynote address by none other than JD Samson (Le Tigre/ Men) and live performances by legendary pioneer of the queercore movement, miss VAGINAL DAVIS, feminist art and music collaborative The Chicks (Chicks on Speed), NYC’s underground rap diva DAI BURGER, Oakland’s poptronic princess AH MER AH SU, Zimbabwean emcee A.W.A. (African Women Arise), and feminist punk icon MEREDITH GRAVES (Perfect Pussy/MTV) + many more inspiring artists. 

Show
Tiny Vipers
12.11.17 Past Show
Monarch

8 years after her last album “Life On Earth”, Jesy Fortino aka Tiny Vipers returns with “Laughter”.

Since the release of her sophomore album Life on Earth in 2009, Seattle-based musician Jesy Fortino (Tiny Vipers) has become a civil engineer. While studying at University of Washington to pursue a wholly new life direction, she wrote and recorded Laughter.
Although Laughter seems like a deviation from the singer-songwriter albums Fortino released on Sub Pop, it can be seen as a continuation of early works such as Empire Prism, and later instrumental works like her 2015 contribution to the ‘Ambience’ series (Box Bedroom Rebels) and collaborations with Rafael Anton Irisarri and Liz Harris (Grouper).

Though Hands Across the Void and Life on Earth are collections of songs, just underneath their facade simmers a raw emotional expression that goes beyond words. Laughter is the result of experiments deconstructing pop tropes. Fortino takes inspiration from early electronic pioneers like Florian Fricke of Popol Vuh, as well as the raw experimentation of 80’s proto-industrial tape culture. Additionally, she carries the seemingly disparate influences of Slava Tsukerman’s Liquid Sky soundtrack and Meredith Monk’s exercise in turning the human voice into a spectral instrument.

The record presents a spectrum of emotions that accompanied Fortino’s engineering studies. Opener “Boarding Charon’s Boat” is full of wonder and curiosity. There is also uncertainty, frustration, and despair, like the lyrics in “K.I.S.S (Keep It Simple Stupid):” “You think you won’t let this world harm you / you think you won’t let anyone down / you’ve listed away your own heart.”

In between these extremes there is a soundscape of patience, hope, discovery, and adventure. The apprehension that comes along with trying something new and challenging is captured in the fragile structure of the compositions, which threaten to fall apart almost as soon as they come together.

Show
Pharoah Sanders Quartet
14.11.17 Past Show
Festsaal Kreuzberg Festsaal Kreuzberg

Pharoah Sanders from his real name Farrell (the name Pharoah is coming from Sun Ra which whom the tenor saxophonist played at the beginning of his career) possesses one of the most distinctive tenor saxophone sounds in jazz. Harmonically rich and heavy with overtones, Sanders’ sound can be as raw and abrasive as it is possible for a saxophonist to produce. Yet, Sanders is highly regarded to the point of reverence by a great many jazz fans. Although he made his name with expressionistic, nearly anarchic free jazz in John Coltrane’s late ensembles of the mid-’60s, Sanders’ later music is guided by more graceful concerns. The hallmarks of Sanders’ playing at that time were naked aggression and unrestrained passion. In the years after Coltrane’s death, however, Sanders explored other, somewhat gentler and perhaps more cerebral avenues — without, it should be added, sacrificing any of the intensity that defined his work as an apprentice to Coltrane. His albums on labels such as Impulse! Verve, Strata East, India Navigation or Theresa are all time classics for a whole generation of music lovers.

Fascinating producer Rabih Beaini – boss of the excellent Morphine Records – is a lone voice in eletronic music, but one that rings loud. His own music, whether under the Morphosis moniker or his own name, has always something spiritual. It brings together dark wave, krautrock, post-everything and techno in haunted hardware harmonies. Our man describes his work as based on a research approach into a variety of instruments and sounds, hybridization, looking to create points where things can gather together or clash and creat something new.

Show
Tricky
28.11.17
Festsaal Kreuzberg Festsaal Kreuzberg

Ultimately, Tricky and trip hop can be treated synonymously. After the release of his debut, Maxinquaye, the man and the genre were irrevocably linked. Don’t get the impression, though, that this is some kind of standstill situation. The Bristolian liked to dabble in punk, 2tone, rock and hip hop in the past as well. After moving to Berlin, he started working on his new project Skilled Mechanics, which was released at the beginning of 2016. It’s a loose cooperation between him and artists DJ Milo, Luke Harris and Chinese rapper Ivy. Now Tricky returns with his 13th album, ununiform, out in September 2017 on his own label False Idols via !K7 Music. It’s a delicate, storming, intricate album that sees Tricky take perhaps his most radical step yet – a journey into happiness and contentment. It’s a record that shows the legendary British producer confront his legacy, history, family – even death itself. And in all of this, he finds the strangest, least familiar thing – peace.

This is the first album-proper made since Tricky moved to Berlin, three years ago. While many people move to the clubbing capital of Europe to party, this was a clean break, in every sense of the word. “I like it here because I don’t know anybody. I eat good food, I go for walks, I’ve got a bike. I’m trying to look after myself. I don’t drink here. Some people call it boring, but I wake at 9am and I’m asleep by 11 o’clock at night. I’m looking after myself.”
Though most of ununiform was made in his adopted capital, four tracks were recorded in a city further east, the capital of Russia. “Moscow is my favourite city in the world,” he says. “I didn’t want to spend Christmas at home, so in December 2016 I spent three weeks there recording and eating Russian food.” The four tracks made in the dead of winter in Moscow feature collaborations with local rappers and producers. “I’ve been listening to Russian rap for 20 years. I love those accents – I don’t need to understand what they’re rapping. I could just feel it. People live like everyday is their last day, and I like that.”

Though the album is more settled and at peace with life than any other that Tricky has recorded, it’s also one shot through with references to the end of life, from the raving, synth-led ‘Dark Days’ to the single ‘When We Die.’ “Word to the wise: I don’t want to die young,” Tricky explains. “But my first memory was seeing my mother dead in her coffin in my family house. I’d go in, stand on the chair and look at her. So I’m saying to that kid on the chair, ‘it’s going to be OK. You’re going to tour the world, you’re going to make music, and the good life is going to come in.’ If you don’t accept death, you don’t really accept life.”

Tricky also credits much of the freedom of ununiform to something more grounded: “This album now is the first album I’ve made (in years) which isn’t going to pay off some kind of debt. So it’s more relaxed!” Referring to his previous albums, False Idols, Adrian Thaws, and the Skilled Mechanics project, he says “I was doing these records thinking ‘the quicker I do this album, the quicker I pay off the tax people.’ So ununiform has been very chilled out. Now, I own the label, I pay for everything myself. I’m a truly independent artist. Now I do what I want. Freedom is a beautiful thing.”

Interestingly, the effect of this new-found financial freedom, and a newly healthy lifestyle, has led to Tricky turning back to his classic sound – perhaps the final frontier for such an inveterate experimentalist. “I’ve got nothing to prove now, and I’m comfortable with referencing myself.” Indeed, he’s since described lead single ‘The Only Way’ as “Hell is Round The Corner, Part 2”. This sensation is perhaps a response to a wave of artists referencing Tricky’s ‘90s records and his approach, from The xx to boundary-pushing London rappers Gaika and CASisDEAD, the latter of which Tricky recently collaborated with. “I’ve got a really wide audience. So I’ve got nothing to prove. I feel like sometimes it’s OK to do it again.”

Show
Grandbrothers
29.11.17
Funkhaus

Grandbrothers will tour Europe and the UK in November, showcasing tracks from theirsecond album, Open, which will be released by City Slang Records on October 20, as wellas 2015’s acclaimed debut, Dilation.

The duo, Erol Sarp and Lukas Vogel, first met seven years ago, forming the synth-freeGrandbrothers in Du?sseldorf only a short while later. Pairing Sarp’s piano skills withVogel’s talent for building the formidably intricate mechanics with which he exploits hispartner’s instrument and also designing its software, Open explores dimensions at whichtheir debut, Dilation, only hinted. On stage, Sarp works at his ivory keyboard while, frombehind his computer keys, Vogel live-samples his partner’s notes, triggering further effectswith the aid of homemade apparatus that physically manipulate the piano’s strings andbody. Live, the inventive contraptions at the heart of their work provide a physicallyastounding and visually astonishing display, so it’s no wonder their music was oncememorably described as “open heart surgery on a grand piano.”

Their performances underline the complexity and vigour of their work, bringing their love oftechno and club music to the fore. As Sarp points out, “We don’t only make music forlistening to, after all. As much as we enjoy playing concert halls with the audience seatedwe also love to play at sweaty clubs where people are standing and dancing around us.“

Show
Girlie, Pigeon, Port Rois
12.11.17 Past Show
Internet Explorer


Show
Halloweird – Cover Band Extravaganza
27.10.17 Past Show
Marie Antoinette

Trick or Treat from your friends at The Chop.

We’re back this year with another round of our favorite local bands covering some big ol’ hollywood names. Featuring:

Fenster as No Doubt

Itaca as Simon & Garfunkel

Martha Rose as The Velvet Underground

PLATTENBAU as The Beastie Boys

Areamann as Aerosmith

Thai Seagull (Members of Balagan and Häxxan) as Weezer

The master of mp3s for the evening will be none other than Kevin Halpinof Shameless/Limitless

Late night goul-grooves by Mariah Scary & Tommy Battola (Ken Chic &WORLD BRAIN)

Please note that this is a Halloween party. People who arrive in costume will receive a free pfeffi shot at the door.

Show
Bird People
05.11.17 Past Show
Bei Ruth

Show
Trepaneringsritualen, Kollaps, Operant
01.12.17
Urban Spree

[aufnahme + wiedergabe] & Instruments of Discipline present

Show
No! Music Festival, Pussy Riot, Pan Daijing, Matana Roberts + More
09.11.17 Past Show
Haus der Kulturen der Welt Haus der Kulturen der Welt

No! Music queries the various dimensions of saying no and the price of independence. The theme days set off in search of the objectors and of possibilities for dissent in music: artists who work counter to the music industry, the expectations of the music market, against constrictive listening and performance habits. Musicians works explore discomfort in the face of marketing mechanisms, who refuse to play along, or, given pervasive auditory overload, are experimenting with the most radical break: the negation of sound itself. They also address the sounds that are not allowed to be heard: censored and banned music.

No! Music will open with a concert by Pussy Riot and a keynote address by Nadja Tolokonnikova.
zeitkratzer will ask where music begins and ends based on La Monte Young’s “Poem for Tables, Chairs, Benches and other Sound Objects” and John White’s “Drinking & Hooting Machine.” Other concert highlights include a new piece by the saxophonist and composer Matana Roberts, which she wrote exclusively for No! Music and will premier with the Chor der Kulturen der Welt; a rare performance by the Texan noise poet Jandek, who has trodden his very unique artistic and economic pathway since the early 1980s; and another commissioned production by the young Brazilian star Tiganá Santana covering the famous album Milagre dos peixes by Milton Nascimento. In 1973, after state censors demanded considerable changes to the lyrics, Nascimento re-recorded the album at the last moment almost entirely using tone syllables.

Running Order

18:45 Pan Daijing
19:00 Zeitkratzer
20:30 Pussy Riot
21:30 Matana Roberts &-Chor der Kulturen der Welt

Show
No! Music Festival, Tiganá Santana, Pan Daijing, Arrigo Barnabé + More
10.11.17 Past Show
Haus der Kulturen der Welt Haus der Kulturen der Welt

No! Music queries the various dimensions of saying no and the price of independence. The theme days
set off in search of the objectors and of possibilities for dissent in music: artists who work counter to the
music industry, the expectations of the music market, against constrictive listening and performance
habits. Musicians works explore discomfort in the face of marketing mechanisms, who refuse to play
along, or, given pervasive auditory overload, are experimenting with the most radical break: the negation
of sound itself. They also address the sounds that are not allowed to be heard: censored and banned
music.
No! Music will open with a concert by Pussy Riot and a keynote address by Nadja Tolokonnikova.
zeitkratzer will ask where music begins and ends based on La Monte Young’s “Poem for Tables, Chairs,
Benches and other Sound Objects” and John White’s “Drinking & Hooting Machine.” Other concert
highlights include a new piece by the saxophonist and composer Matana Roberts, which she wrote
exclusively for No! Music and will premier with the Chor der Kulturen der Welt; a rare performance by the
Texan noise poet Jandek, who has trodden his very unique artistic and economic pathway since the early
1980s; and another commissioned production by the young Brazilian star Tiganá Santana covering the
famous album Milagre dos peixes by Milton Nascimento. In 1973, after state censors demanded
considerable changes to the lyrics, Nascimento re-recorded the album at the last moment almost entirely
using tone syllables.

Show
No! Music Festival, 4’33” Gala, Toshimaru Nakamura + More
11.11.17 Past Show
Haus der Kulturen der Welt Haus der Kulturen der Welt

No! Music queries the various dimensions of saying no and the price of independence. The theme days set off in search of the objectors and of possibilities for dissent in music: artists who work counter to the music industry, the expectations of the music market, against constrictive listening and performance habits. Musicians works explore discomfort in the face of marketing mechanisms, who refuse to play along, or, given pervasive auditory overload, are experimenting with the most radical break: the negation of sound itself. They also address the sounds that are not allowed to be heard: censored and banned music.

No! Music will open with a concert by Pussy Riot and a keynote address by Nadja Tolokonnikova.
zeitkratzer will ask where music begins and ends based on La Monte Young’s “Poem for Tables, Chairs, Benches and other Sound Objects” and John White’s “Drinking & Hooting Machine.” Other concert highlights include a new piece by the saxophonist and composer Matana Roberts, which she wrote exclusively for No! Music and will premier with the Chor der Kulturen der Welt; a rare performance by the Texan noise poet Jandek, who has trodden his very unique artistic and economic pathway since the early 1980s; and another commissioned production by the young Brazilian star Tiganá Santana covering the famous album Milagre dos peixes by Milton Nascimento. In 1973, after state censors demanded considerable changes to the lyrics, Nascimento re-recorded the album at the last moment almost entirely using tone syllables.

Running Order

15:00 Film: Yangon Calling – Punk in Myanmar, 62 min
16:00 Panel: Punk als Prinzip (mit Avi Pitchon, Peter Hein, Martina Schöne-Radunski
[Cuntroaches] u.a. Moderation: Conny Lösch)
17:30 Lecture Bill Drummond
18:30 Film: Imagine Waking Up Tomorrow and All Music Has Disappeared, 83 min
19:45 Pan Daijing
20:00 4’33’’-Gala mit Isolation Berlin, Jolly Goods, Lambert, Lucretia Dalt, Die Maulwerker,
Wolfgang Müller, Perera Elsewhere, Claire Tolan, Mary Ocher, Zugezogen Maskulin
Moderation: Max Dax
22:00 Toshimaru Nakamura: No Input Mixing Desk

Show
No! Music Festival, Jandek, Nihilist Spasm Band + More
12.11.17 Past Show
Haus der Kulturen der Welt

No! Music queries the various dimensions of saying no and the price of independence. The theme days
set off in search of the objectors and of possibilities for dissent in music: artists who work counter to the
music industry, the expectations of the music market, against constrictive listening and performance
habits. Musicians works explore discomfort in the face of marketing mechanisms, who refuse to play
along, or, given pervasive auditory overload, are experimenting with the most radical break: the negation
of sound itself. They also address the sounds that are not allowed to be heard: censored and banned
music.
No! Music will open with a concert by Pussy Riot and a keynote address by Nadja Tolokonnikova.
zeitkratzer will ask where music begins and ends based on La Monte Young’s “Poem for Tables, Chairs,
Benches and other Sound Objects” and John White’s “Drinking & Hooting Machine.” Other concert
highlights include a new piece by the saxophonist and composer Matana Roberts, which she wrote
exclusively for No! Music and will premier with the Chor der Kulturen der Welt; a rare performance by the
Texan noise poet Jandek, who has trodden his very unique artistic and economic pathway since the early
1980s; and another commissioned production by the young Brazilian star Tiganá Santana covering the
famous album Milagre dos peixes by Milton Nascimento. In 1973, after state censors demanded
considerable changes to the lyrics, Nascimento re-recorded the album at the last moment almost entirely
using tone syllables.

Running Order

14:30 Film: No Land’s Song, 90 min
16:00 Lecture Wael Koudaih: Laws of Probabilities or How to Compose Music that is
Compatible with the Sharia?
17:00 Panel: DIY or Die: Is Bartleby Dead in the Post-Digital Age? (mit Adam Harper,
Geert Lovink, Daniela Seitz [Creamcake] u.a. Moderation: Lisa Blanning)
18:30 Film: Jandek on Corwood 90 min
19:45 Pan Daijing
20:00 Jandek
21:30 Nihilist Spasm Band feat. Alexander Hacke

Show
Bird People

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